Rat Trap

Jason Alexander Williams didn’t mess around when it came to killing rodents. His ‘animal trap’ (patented in 1882) shot them dead:

My invention relates to an improvement in animal-traps; and it consists in the combination of a suitable frame upon which a revolver or pistol is secured, a treadle which is secured to the front end of this frame, and a suitable spring and levers, by which the firearm is discharged when the animal steps upon the treadle, as will be more fully described hereinafter.

The object of my invention is to provide a means by which animals which burrow in the ground can be destroyed, and which trap will give an alarm each time that it goes off, so that it can be reset.

And his invention didn’t just kill rodents. Williams noted:

This invention may also be used in connection with a door or window, so as to kill any person or thing opening the door or window to which it is attached.

via weirduniverse.net

Sister Mary Kenneth Keller (PHD, 1965): The First PHD In Computer Science in the US

In 1965, sister Mary Kenneth Keller was the first woman to get a Ph.D in computer science. She believed that the use of computers have boundless capacity for the sharing of information.

Sister Mary worked on developing the BASIC programming language. BASIC is a way of translating the zeroes and ones of computer code into something more intuitive and straightforward. It is a general-purpose, high level programming language which helped broaden computer programming into non maths and science fields, subsequently giving many people their first experience with programming.

Andy, the Footless Goose

In the late 1980s a gosling was born in Harvard, Nebraska. Although this is a relatively common occurrence, this little hatchling was different, as he was born with stumps for feet. A local inventor named Gene Fleming heard of this and fitted the goose named Andy with specially made Nike baby shoes. Andy gained fame as a role model for disabled children and Nike provided him with a lifetime supply of shoes.